Spider-Man: Far From Home Review

Spider-Man: Far From Home
  • Far From Home Takes Spider-Man To Great, New Places

Summary

At the end of the day, Spider-Man: Far From Home is a fun superhero action/adventure movie. It's got great spectacle, great characters, and a great deal of heart to it. It's yet another solid entry into the MCU, and a good wrap-up of the Infinity saga, while also a good launching point for the next phase of the Marvel Universe. It doesn't quite reach the heights of Infinity War or Endgame, but it is a step above movies like Ant-Man and Doctor Strange (and a huge improvement over Captain Marvel, for certain).

3.5
Spider-Man: Far From Home Review

Spider-Man: Far From Home is both a sequel to 2017’s Spider-Man: Homecoming and a denouement to the Infinity War saga. This means that while it continues and expands upon the characters and storylines that were introduced in Homecoming, it also gives us a look at the aftermath of the Marvel Cinematic Universe after Avengers: Endgame, while setting the stage for what is to come in the next phase of the MCU.

In staying true to the spirit of Spider-Man, Far From Home is a light and whimsical adventure with plenty of action and humor in it, along with a great deal of heart. It also keeps alive the tradition of piling on poor Peter Parker in his civilian life, as nothing ever seems to go right for him while he tries to balance a healthy secret identity with the trials and tribulations of being a superhero.

One of the most impressive parts of Far From Home is that the Peter Parker story is just as interesting and engaging as the Spider-Man story, much like it was in Homecoming. Too often in Spider-Man movies, the “Peter Parker” aspect can weigh down the film and get in the way of the more interesting Spider-Man stuff. But here, a good balance is struck, as Peter’s friends and relationships are all very well developed and interesting to watch.

A big part of Far From Home’s “Peter Plot” has to do with him trying to win the affection of the MJ character (played by actress Zendaya). And while Homecoming’s “teen crush” storyline with Liz wasn’t all that engaging, the one here with MJ seems to work – probably because MJ is a more interesting character than Liz was. Plus, the stuff with Peter’s best friend Ned and Betty Brant is fantastic, as these two characters round out the “Spidey” crew in high school.

Indeed, much of what seems to make Far From Home work is the “teen angst” aspect, which is awkward, heartwarming, and relatable. It’s also the source of a great deal of the humor in the movie. But the biggest aspect which gives the movie its heart is Spider-Man’s relationship with Tony Stark.

Since Captain America: Civil War, the character of Tony Stark has taken on the “surrogate father” figure to Peter Parker. Though traditionally, the character of Uncle Ben was the real catalyst which drove Peter to be a hero, in the revamped MCU version of Spider-Man, that role has been largely filled by Tony. And with Tony’s sacrifice at the end of Endgame, his death is far more poignant than Uncle Ben’s (especially considering that we never got to see Uncle Ben or get a sense of his relationship with MCU’s Peter).

Much of Far From Home is about seeing how the world is reacting to the sacrifice Tony Stark made to save them from Thanos, but none feel that sacrifice as acutely as Peter. Not only does he miss and mourn the loss of his mentor and surrogate father, but he also feels the burden of having to “step up” and fill the shoes of the hero that Iron Man was to the world, and for a 16 year old kid, the prospect of that is incredibly daunting.

While Far From Home hits all the right notes in terms of theme, tone, and pacing, one thing it doesn’t quite get right is its central conflict. One of the interesting things about Spider-Man is that his villains are rarely the type that actually threaten the world, and this smaller-in-scale aspect often serves to make the conflict with them more personal. This trend continues in Far From Home as Spider-Man bonds with the mysterious Mysterio – a new supposed hero from an alternate Earth who has come to fight destructive Elementals who have found their way to the MCU Earth.

Though Mysterio ends up being a fine adversary to Peter, and it is interesting to see their relationship develop in the first half of the film, the “big reveal” behind Mysterio (while expected if you know anything about the comic book version of the character) is still anti-climactic and ultimately a little disappointing. That being said, there is no lack for spectacle in Far From Home, as the film has numerous action set-pieces to enjoy – even if they aren’t all as emotionally resonate as they should be.

From here on, I’ll be diving into spoilers for the film, so if you wish to avoid these, simply do not expand the SPOILER area below.

At the end of the day, Spider-Man: Far From Home is a fun superhero action/adventure movie. It’s got great spectacle, great characters, and a great deal of heart to it. It’s yet another solid entry into the MCU, and a good wrap-up of the Infinity saga, while also a good launching point for the next phase of the Marvel Universe. It doesn’t quite reach the heights of Infinity War or Endgame, but it is a step above movies like Ant-Man and Doctor Strange (and a huge improvement over Captain Marvel, for certain).

I’d definitely recommend checking this movie out. Despite a few minor quibbles in terms of its central conflict, all the elements for a good Spider-Man movie are present, and you will not be bored with this film. It gets a solid 3 1/2 stars out of 5 from me.

Have you seen Spider-Man: Far From Home? What did you think of it? Do you agree with my review? Let me know in the comments!

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